top of page

Group

Public·36 members

Acrostic


Welcome to Acrostics.org, the world's largest web site devoted to acrostic puzzles! We've got more than 25,000 unique acrostic puzzles available for play, both online and the old fashioned way - with pencil and paper. Feel free to solve online just for fun, or, for an added challenge, register a free account and compete against thousands of other solvers to make it into our Acrostic Hall of Fame!




acrostic



An acrostic puzzle is sort of a hybrid between a cryptogram and a crossword puzzle. Your goal is to reveal a hidden quote in the grid at the top by correctly answering the crossword-style clues near the bottom of the puzzle. Each letter in the quote is linked to a letter in one of the clue answers. As you fill in more and more answers, more letters will begin to fill the quote grid, until eventually the entire quote is revealed. What's more, the author and/or source of the quote will be spelled out when you read the first letter of each answer.


The acrostics you've come to love from Puzzle Baron, now on your favorite mobile or tablet! It comes standard with a library of 50 puzzles covering a variety of subjects, and there are many, many more puzzles available via in-app purchase. Solve acrostics with just a touch of your finger... Try it now!


The Puzzle Baron family of web sites has served millions and millions of puzzle enthusiasts since its inception in 2006. From jigsaw puzzles to acrostics, logic puzzles to drop quotes, numbergrids to wordtwist and even sudoku and crossword puzzles, we run the gamut in word puzzles, printable puzzles and logic games.


Acrostics are common in medieval literature, where they usually serve to highlight the name of the poet or his patron, or to make a prayer to a saint. They are most frequent in verse works but can also appear in prose. The Middle High German poet Rudolf von Ems for example opens all his great works with an acrostic of his name, and his world chronicle marks the beginning of each age with an acrostic of the key figure (Moses, David, etc.). In chronicles, acrostics are common in German and English but rare in other languages.[3]


Relatively simple acrostics may merely spell out the letters of the alphabet in order; such an acrostic may be called an 'alphabetical acrostic' or abecedarius. These acrostics occur in the first four of the five chapters that make up the Book of Lamentations, in the praise of the good wife in Proverbs 31:10-31, and in Psalms 9-10, 25, 34, 37, 111, 112, 119 and 145 of the Hebrew Bible.[4]Notable among the acrostic Psalms is the long Psalm 119, which typically is printed in subsections named after the 22 letters of the Hebrew alphabet, each section consisting of 8 verses, each of which begins with the same letter of the alphabet and the entire psalm consisting of 22 x 8 = 176 verses; and Psalm 145, which is recited three times a day in the Jewish services. Some acrostic psalms are technically imperfect. For example, Psalm 9 and Psalm 10 appear to constitute a single acrostic psalm together, but the length assigned to each letter is unequal and five of the 22 letters of the Hebrew alphabet are not represented and the sequence of two letters is reversed. In Psalm 25 one Hebrew letter is not represented, the following letter (Resh) repeated. In Psalm 34 the current final verse, 23, does fit verse 22 in content, but adds an additional line to the poem. In Psalms 37 and 111 the numbering of verses and the division into lines are interfering with each other; as a result in Psalm 37, for the letters Daleth and Kaph there is only one verse, and the letter Ayin is not represented. Psalm 111 and 112 have 22 lines, but 10 verses. Psalm 145 does not represent the letter Nun, having 21 one verses, but one Qumran manuscript of this Psalm does have that missing line, which agrees with the Septuagint.


Often the ease of detectability of an acrostic can depend on the intention of its creator. In some cases an author may desire an acrostic to have a better chance of being perceived by an observant reader, such as the acrostic contained in the Hypnerotomachia Poliphili (where the key capital letters are decorated with ornate embellishments). However, acrostics may also be used as a form of steganography, where the author seeks to conceal the message rather than proclaim it. This might be achieved by making the key letters uniform in appearance with the surrounding text, or by aligning the words in such a way that the relationship between the key letters is less obvious. These are referred to as null ciphers in steganography, using the first letter of each word to form a hidden message in an otherwise innocuous text.[5] Using letters to hide a message, as in acrostic ciphers, was popular during the Renaissance, and could employ various methods of enciphering, such as selecting other letters than initials based on a repeating pattern (equidistant letter sequences), or even concealing the message by starting at the end of the text and working backwards.[6]


There is an acrostic secreted in the Dutch national anthem Het Wilhelmus[7] (The William): the first letters of its fifteen stanzas spell WILLEM VAN NASSOV. This was one of the hereditary titles of William of Orange (William the Silent), who introduces himself in the poem to the Dutch people. This title also returned in the 2010 speech from the throne, during the Dutch State Opening of Parliament, whose first 15 lines also formed WILLEM VAN NASSOV.


In October of 2009, California governor Arnold Schwarzenegger sent a note to assemblyman Tom Ammiano in which the first letters of lines 3-9 spell "Fuck You"; Schwarzenegger claimed that the acrostic message was coincidental, which mathematician Stephen Devlin disputed as statistically implausible.[9][10]


In the 2012 third novel of his Caged Flower[13] series, author Cullman Wallace used acrostics as a plot device. The parents of a protagonist send e-mails where the first letters of the lines reveal their situation in a concealed message.


On 19 August 2017, the members of president Donald Trump's Committee on Arts and Humanities resigned in protest over his response to the Unite the Right rally incident in Charlottesville, Virginia. The members' letter of resignation contained the acrostic "RESIST" formed from the first letter of each paragraph.[14]


The poem Behold, O God!, by William Browne,[20] can be considered a complex kind of acrostic. In the manuscript, some letters are capitalized and written extra-large, non-italic, and in red, and the lines are shifted left or right and internally spaced out as necessary to position the red letters within three crosses that extend through all the lines of the poem. The letters within each cross spell out a verse from the New Testament:


(The text of the manuscript shown differs significantly from the text usually published, including in the reference.[20] Many of the lines have somewhat different wording; and while the acrostics are the same as far as they go, the published text is missing the last four lines, truncating the acrostics to "Lord, remember me when thou comest into thy kin", "O God, my God, why hast thou forsak", and "If thou art the Christ, save thyself". The manuscript text is printed below, first as normal poetry, then spaced and bolded to bring out the acrostics. The word "Thou" in line 8 is not visible in this photograph, but is in the published version and is included in a cross-stitch sampler of the poem from 1793.[21])


Acrostics are a very old literary device. They were used as early as the writing of the Hebrew Bible thousands of years ago. Rather than spell words, these acrostics used every letter of the Hebrew alphabet in order.


To begin with, an acrostic is a poem in which the first letters of each line spell out a word or phrase. The word or phrase can be a name, a thing, or whatever you like. When children write acrostics, they will often use their own first name, or sometimes the first name of a friend.


short poem in which the initial letters of the lines, taken in order, spell a word or phrase, 1580s, from Medieval Latin acrostichis, from Greek akrostikhis, from akros "at the end, outermost" (from PIE root *ak- "be sharp, rise (out) to a point, pierce") + stikhos "line of verse," literally "row, line" (from PIE root *steigh- "to stride, step, rise;" see stair). The second element is properly -stich, but it has been assimilated to words in -ic. As an adjective from 1680s.


Intimate, colorful, and encoded acrostic jewelry first appeared in the early 1800's. Each letter of the alphabet was made to correspond with a different precious gemstone, and the so-called "secret language of gems" was born. For example, a Victorian favorite combo, "DEAREST", would be "spelled" this way: Diamond, Emerald, Amethyst, Ruby, Emerald, Sapphire, Turquoise. Get it? Our acrostic necklace is a completely personal way to celebrate an important event, express a sentiment, or wear a loved one's name. Customize yours using our interactive stone-picker - we won't tell a soul what it says. We make your necklace length to order!


Your mission as a middle school language arts teacher is to stimulate the creativity of your students. We know that your class on acrostic poems is essential and that you want it to be a success. Well, look no further, you have found the perfect template to achieve it. Discover the beautiful animated and illustrated design of this presentation with which you can teach the theory, the types of poems and their uses. In addition, you will find many activities that you can propose to your students so that they can create their own poems and have fun. Download it now!


then acrostic will rearrange the notes of each chord in each column according to a particular algorithm (several algorithms are available and they are randomly selected). for example, the above might be re-arranged into the following:


acrostic does not handle tempo changes well. its best to set the tempo you want and then start acrostic. if you do change the tempo, make sure to change the beats of a chord (you can change it from and back to) which will trigger acrostic to re-assign the sample lengths. 041b061a72


About

Welcome to the group! You can connect with other members, ge...
Group Page: Groups_SingleGroup
bottom of page